Did You Get The Memo? Poverty, broadband and a cap-and-trade study

Did You Get The Memo? Poverty, broadband and a cap-and-trade study

Amid all the floor debates, press conferences and committee hearings, the Pennsylvania General Assembly’s newest co-sponsorship memos can get lost in the shuffle. That’s why The PLS Reporter rounds up some of the most noteworthy co-sponsorship memos each week — so you can stay informed of what’s going on in the Capitol.

 

In this week’s feature are memos for proposals that would address poverty across Pennsylvania, deploy small antennas for wireless broadband internet access and study the impacts a cap-and-trade program could have on Pennsylvania.

Friday, June 7, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Members of the Task Force on lead exposure announces recommendations on lead exposure

Members of the Task Force on lead exposure announces recommendations on lead exposure

A bipartisan group of senators banded together Tuesday to call for legislative action on lead poisoning as they unveiled bills to address lead contamination in homes, buildings and water systems. 

The legislative package is a direct result of the state’s Advisory Committee and Task Force on Lead Exposure, which was established in 2017. Led by Sen. John Yudichak (D-Luzerne), the senators announced bills that would require universal lead testing for children, mandate inspections of child-care facilities, establish a statewide lead-free housing registry, and require all school drinking systems to be inspected and certified. 
Tuesday, May 7, 2019/Author: Kara Barmoy
Categories: Video
NEPA legislators want to save waste coal industry, even as environmental concerns remain

NEPA legislators want to save waste coal industry, even as environmental concerns remain

NESQUEHONING, Pa.—A bipartisan group of lawmakers are pushing to boost the state’s coal refuse industry, arguing more needs to be done to enhance the public-private partnership to avoid a fate similar to that of the state’s nuclear industry.

Currently, there are almost 200,000 acres of abandoned coal mines in Pennsylvania. In an effort to reclaim that land, 13 power plants across the state burn the waste coal for fuel. They then sell the energy and use those funds to invest in improving the mine-scarred land, which can then be developed.
Wednesday, May 1, 2019/Author: Andrew Bahl
Categories: News and Views
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