Would House Bill 11 save Three Mile Island? Exelon says yes, but some lawmakers aren’t so sure

Would House Bill 11 save Three Mile Island? Exelon says yes, but some lawmakers aren’t so sure

Proponents of a bill that would add nuclear power to the state’s alternative energy portfolio and provide a ratepayer-funded subsidy to nuclear power companies argue that it could save the struggling Three Mile Island power plant in Dauphin County. However, during the second House Consumer Affairs Committee hearing for House Bill 11 on Monday, some lawmakers questioned how significant the bill’s effect would be, and whether it would actually save the plant at all.   
 
The Three Mile Island generating station is scheduled to be decommissioned this fall, barring aid from state government officials. Supporters of House Bill 11 argue that the legislation is necessary not only to keeping energy costs affordable and stable, but to also save the plant from premature retirement. 
Monday, April 15, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Did You Get The Memo? Proposals for a ban on kratom, school self-defense training and Right-to-Know reforms

Did You Get The Memo? Proposals for a ban on kratom, school self-defense training and Right-to-Know reforms

A weekly look at new proposals from lawmakers in the Pennsylvania General Assembly. In our latest iteration of our weekly feature on new co-sponsorship memoranda, we take a look at proposals to ban the herbal supplement kratom, potential changes to the state’s Right-to-Know Law, and self-defense training for school employees. 

Friday, April 12, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Did You Get The Memo? Licensure reform, terminal illnesses and political contributions

Did You Get The Memo? Licensure reform, terminal illnesses and political contributions

State lawmakers have found common ground in the past year, tackling issues such as ethics reform, drug addiction and workforce development. Legislators on both sides of the aisle have expressed an interest in even more collaborative efforts, including those that continue to address the ongoing opioid crisis, as well as occupational licensure reform. 

In the past week, a variety of proposals have been introduced in the General Assembly, touching on everything from occupational licensure to criminal justice reform. In this week’s feature, we look at some of the newest proposals introduced in Harrisburg and what they could mean for Pennsylvania citizens.
Friday, April 5, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Pension forfeiture bill nears governor’s desk

Pension forfeiture bill nears governor’s desk

In what will likely be the first bill signed into law this session, SB 113 is nearing Gov. Tom Wolf’s desk and after confirmation to a House amendment by the Senate, is just a signature away from strengthening pension forfeiture requirements for public officials convicted of job-related felonies.  

The bill, sponsored by Sen. John DiSanto (R-Dauphin), aims to close a loophole that currently allows public employees to keep taxpayer-funded pensions when convicted of certain felonies. If signed into law, those found guilty of crimes relating to public employment — including conspiracy — would have their pension benefits forfeited under the new law.
Tuesday, March 19, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
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