State, insurers agree to open up medication-assisted addiction treatment

State, insurers agree to open up medication-assisted addiction treatment

After reaching an agreement with Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration, seven state insurers will now cover medication-assisted addiction treatment, using substances such as methadone, without prior authorization.

State cabinet members, including Insurance Commissioner Jessica Altman, said that the agreement will save people with substance abuse time normally spent checking with insurance companies to see if they’d cover a plan.
Friday, October 12, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
House Democrats investigate breast cancer coverage legislation

House Democrats investigate breast cancer coverage legislation

The House Democratic Policy Committee at a public hearing Wednesday discussed a bill that would provide additional insurance coverage for women susceptible to breast cancer.

Friday, June 1, 2018/Author: Taylor Allen
Categories: News and Views
Senate Republican leaders pen open letter to Pennsylvania health insurers

Senate Republican leaders pen open letter to Pennsylvania health insurers

Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R-Jefferson), Majority Leader Jake Corman (R-Center), and Banking and Insurance Committee Majority Chairman Don White (R-Indiana) penned an open letter to Pennsylvania health insurers Friday asking them to charge their customers no more than they requested the Insurance Department approve despite the department establishing Affordable Care Act rate increase higher than what the companies sought.

 

Earlier this month, Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller announced that the average Affordable Care Act individual rate increased 32.5 percent while the average small group rate increased by just over seven percent.

Friday, October 28, 2016/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views

Bill Prohibiting Multiple Co-Payments to Receive Unusual Hearing Tuesday

On April 29th the Senate took the unusual procedural step of recommitting a bill, SB 594, back to the committee from which it had been reported from nearly three weeks earlier. The reason, made explicit during the April 9th voting meeting on the legislation, was so that a public hearing could be held to air out the implications of the measure, which is intended to prevent insurance companies from charging separate co-pays for separate services during a trip to a single provider.


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Monday, May 5, 2014/Author: The PLS Reporter
Categories: News and Views
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